Ambient Air Quality

Innovation in Air Quality Monitoring Award

In many ways, the development of the Praxis/Urban and Praxis/OPCube has been a long running R&D project, culminating in a robust product that is able to answer real-world challenges for researchers and commercial customers alike.

Is your air quality data fit for decision making?

South Coast Science will be exhibiting at Advanced Engineering UK next week, as one of only 8 start-ups selected to take a stand in the Enabling Innovation zone. 

UK – Argentina: Cost effective Air Quality Monitoring in South America

Brainco, suppliers of reference systems, CEMS and AQMS, are partnering with South Coast Science to supply Praxis products to customers across Argentina.

MCERTS: A breath of fresh air for AQM standards

By the end of 2021 South Coast Science expects to receive MCERTS certification for their dust monitoring and urban air quality products.

Demo: Real-time Air Quality Dashboard

South Coast Science puts all its thinking inside the Praxis/Urban box, so you can attend to air quality outside the box. Test our demo dashboard for Brighton traffic hot-spot Preston Circus, to see this for yourself.

Australia-UK Partnership for Ambient Air Monitoring

ECO Environmental - one of Australia’s largest providers of environmental monitoring equipment - have partnered with South Coast Science to distribute Praxis ambient air quality monitors across Australia.

Smart & Sustainable Ports: Air pollution management

As the commercial success of a port increases the prosperity of the surrounding community, pollution levels tend to increase. How do we accurately assess it?

Praxis/Urban on tour: European Geoscience Union 2021 Conference

Praxis/Urban instruments were deployed in Fairbanks to measure gases (CO, NO, NO2, O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) during the Arctic winter of 2019. Dr Tjarda Roberts presented findings at the European Geoscience Union 2021 conference.

Air pollution overtakes AIDS related deaths

Research findings show that annual PM2.5 concentrations in some African cities are as much as 5 times over the WHO limit for health-harmful concentration.